She has won various awards and nominations, has taken part in several exhibitions including the Mois off de la photo 08 in Paris, the Greek America Foundation / Film & Photo Week 2014 in Toronto, the Lishui Photography Festival 2015 in China and more. Myrto has published in numerous publications around the globe and her clients include: TIME Magazine, Le Monde, The Guardian, GEO International, The Washington Post, Nationalgeographic.com etc.

Today she works as a freelance photographer and a documentary filmmaker and is represented by Redux Pictures in NY.


Exploring the new silk road
For centuries one of the world's most isolated areas, the Pamir mountains of Tajikistan is currently being opened up to new economic development mainly via Chinese investment in the region's rudimentary infrastructure.
"We wanted to work on the story that has not been told at that time."
This project aims to chronicle how a traditional culture is being transformed. A wider socio-economic trend is reflected in the changes to the daily lives of those affected.
500 km west from the border of China, the city of Khorog is the first primary point along the new silk road. This is the capital city of the mountainous Gorno-Badakshan Autonomous Province in Tajikistan, and at its heart: the Khorog city market.

The film process started in 2011. Myrto and her partner were not looking for interesting topics internationally. One day they basically saw the article in the magazine and that is how they actually learned about the construction of the road in Tajikistan. About the city of Khorog of the mountainous Gorno-Badakshan Autonomous Province in Tajikistan, which became the first primary point along the new silk road.
Tajikistan is the first city in the Central Asia so it was interesting for us to see China over the board of the country in 2008 during the reconstruction of the trade road. That year it started a new type of the silk road to export goods from the east to the west. The New Plastic Road become the main in Palmyra, the main road, where the whole goods travel from the east to the west. And we wanted to see how this new development effect on the country.
On the way to make a film
Myrto
1
The guide
We actually talked to a few people whose were working at that time in very specific positions to be able to talk to local residents, to find a protagonist and the main city in Tajikistan.
2
Looking for the city
We found out about a small town Khorog in the mountainous Gorno-Badakshan Autonomous Province in Tajikistan. So, this town became a place, where we were working.
3
The protagonist
We had to do a lot of researches and find our protagonist, Davlat, before we starting the film. We stayed in the area more than for a month doing researches and then after one week we started travelling.
" People there were very hospitable with us and very opened and we really felt Tajikistan and the families we have met. They became a part of our family. You know, we have been going there for so many years now, so it is a part of our lives, a very crucial part of our lives. They are very hospitable, so it was quite easy for us to start filming."
mediacongress:
What difficulties did you have during the film process?
Myrto:
The difficulties were in how to reach that area, Tajikistan and the Palmyra. So the hardest part of this process was the actual journey, the travel.
mediacongress:
How many business trips did you have?
Myrto:
I think we have five or six. I do not remember. We have been going there since 2007. And our last trip was in the last October. So, five trips I think.
People always have different reactions on a person who tries to make a video with them. Usually I try to make reports of people who agree to be filmed, other times you have to improvise and film without permission. The problems usually come when you want to shoot something related to the State, something official, the Russian bureaucracy can be quite tedious.
Vorkuta. Life in the tundra
The trailer of the last work of Ricardo, which he shot in March 2018 in Vorkuta, a city in the Russian Arctic, which struggles to move forward despite difficult weather conditions.
In 2011 Rivcardo had been living in Russia for 4 years, in St. Petersburg, but that year he moved to Moscow, and started working for several Russian media, which allowed him to travel a lot. The same time he created his YouTube channel that was growing little by little with his trips to the different regions of Russian and YouTube Channel to the countries of the former USSR.
Mediacongress:
It seems that you have visited different parts of Russia: from St. Petersburg to Norilsk. We also know that you filmed in Chernobyl and Donetsk. Could you tell us about the projects connected with those regions?

Ricardo:
In 2011 Rivcardo had been living in Russia for 4 years, in St. Petersburg, but that year he moved to Moscow, and started working for several Russian media, which allowed him to travel a lot. The same time he created his YouTube channel that was growing little by little with his trips to the different regions of Russian and YouTube Channel to the countries of the former USSR.
Vorkuta. Life in the tundra
The trailer of the last work of Ricardo, which he shot in March 2018 in Vorkuta, a city in the Russian Arctic, which struggles to move forward despite difficult weather conditions.
Mediacongress:
Do you think do Russians and Spanish have something in common?
Ricardo:
In my opinion, in general, all people, regardless the nationality, have much in common. We want to live as best as possible, at peace, without bothering others and without being disturbed. The human being is basically the same all over the world.
Mediacongress:
What does enrapture and mesmerize you about Russia? And on the other side, what is scaring you?
Ricardo:
As a journalist Russia and the former USSR is a very interesting place, full of very different stories and landscapes. Russia is a multi-ethnic and multi-religious country that has many stories to tell, this is what I like the most. I not afraid of nothing about Russia, but I do not like the current inability of many Russians to be critical of themselves and their country.
I like picturesque things like the Maslenitsa, but what I like the most is visiting places in Siberia and the Russian Arctic. In these years I have had many visits from family and friends, usually the impression is very positive, perhaps because, despite everything, Russia is still a great unknown.
Professional tips
Honestly, I do not believe that I am qualified to give advice to anyone, we all make our way with our mistakes and successes, but I'd try to...
1
Make you dream become your profession
Many photographers and photo journalists are dreaming about working and traveling at the same time like I do. Of course, I had difficulties, starting a new life in a new country is complicated for everyone: economic problems, the language, the bureaucracy... everything that could go wrong at some point, went wrong. The trick is to not give up.
2
Always have a plan
What I can do is share what is my work scheme, for the next 10-15 years. Have a long-term goblal idea. Have concrete short-term projects. Be consistent and meet the goals.
3
Every moment is unique
What city I would suggest to young fotographers to start their work? If we talk about a Russian city, Moscow is a great base camp, from here you can visit the whole country, but St. Petersburg is a unique city, where there is always some new corner to discover.

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